Books I Read in October

4 November 2019

As I’ve tallied up the books I’ve read in these monthly posts, I’ve thrown in the screenplays I’ve read as well. They might not be technically books, especially given the fact that I’m reading most of them as PDFs, but I’m reading them and they’re worth talking about, so in the lists they go. I’m also linking directly to the PDFs of the screenplays so that you can play along at home if you are so inclined.

Here are the books (and screenplays) I read in October.

Read more →

The Weird, the Wild and the Horrific

26 October 2019

Happy Halloween season, let’s watch weird movies. I put together a list of my favorite possibly overlooked horror-ish films currently streaming. If you watch all of these, I promise you that your algorithmically-generated recommendations will be interesting for some time to come.

Read more →

Books I Read in September

1 October 2019

Reading went pretty well this month. Maybe my Goodreads yearly reading challenge goal will smile kindly on me after all. Here are the books and screenplays I read in September.

Read more →

Books I Read in August

7 September 2019

You know the drill. Here’s the rundown of August’s books.

Read more →

Books I Read in May, June and July

5 August 2019

I recently returned to writing more about the books I read in my weekly email newsletter, but, since it’s never a comprehensive list, I’m going to keep up posting full lists and thoughts here. After a time of distraction and little reading, I have three months worth of books to recap.

Read more →

Eating and Drinking at Disney World 2019

2 August 2019

Not too long ago, an ill-informed op-ed made the internet rounds claiming that people without kids shouldn’t go to Disney World. I can’t expound any further on that theory, because I didn’t bother to read the piece, because the premise is dumb. Not only should everyone who wants to go to Disney World go to Disney World regardless of whether or not they have offspring in tow, Disney World has one quality that is of interest to adults in particular: it’s full of good stuff to eat and drink.

Read more →

On Birthdays

26 July 2019

Today I am thirty-eight years old, which means that I have accumulated thirty-eight years’ worth of facts, trivia and mythology about what my birthday means. My birthstone is a ruby (represents positive energy, passion and prosperity). My astrological sign is Leo (represents confidence, ambition and self-centeredness). I share my birthday with Helen Mirren (heck yeah), Stanley Kubrick (checks out) and Kevin Spacey (unfortunate). I was born under a significant star, destined for greatness in the company of an elite—just like everyone else, in one way or another.

Read more →

Independence Day

4 July 2019

One of my favorite things ever written about America is by Sarah Vowell in her book Layfayette in the Somewhat United States. The book as a whole is a modern trip through the history of the Marquis de Layfayette and his odd role in the making of revolutionary mythology, but, about three quarters of the way through the book, there is brief detour to another location of historical significance. Vowell writes:

Read more →

Books I Read in April

3 May 2019

Reading! I am doing it! Picking up the pace a bit, although my Goodreads yearly challenge “on schedule” number is still smarting.

Read more →

The House on the Rock

13 April 2019

The first time I heard about the House on the Rock, I thought it wasn’t a real place. In Neil Gaiman’s novel American Gods, it fits right in along the other fantastical locations described there, like the land of the dead, the otherworldly dimension called “Backstage,” and Chicago. I read about this ultimate roadside attraction, sprawled around a remote portion of Wisconsin and filled with musical automatons, collections of curiosities and the largest carousel in the world that no one is allowed to ride—the place where the gods congregate because it represents the uniquely American fascination with oddities that sprung from the vacuum of a more profound mythology and is therefore a strange kind of sacred—and I just assumed, reasonably, that someone made it all up.

Read more →

Daily Archive